Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 7

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, continued. The two-day, one-night trip was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

Seneca Lake

View of Seneca Lake from Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel / Photo: Clark Hoskin

After dinner on the first day, the group checked in at the Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel on Seneca Lake. Many of the group relaxed in the downstairs bar and traded thoughts and enthusiasm about the day. Christine Peacock of Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel was our group’s contact. She provided excellent service in the planning leading up to our trip, and during our stay. A few individuals visited the Crooked Rooster Brewpub in downtown Watkins Glen and spoke with the brew master there.

“Top-notch overnight accommodation” – comment from our group

The morning light exposed the remnants of various ice sculptures in the courtyard of the hotel overlooking the lake. We later learned that the hotel is the host of the annual Ice Bar fundraising event for the Finger Lakes Chapter of the American Red Cross. Here is article explaining the event and the hotel’s involvement:

Watkins Glen Ice Bar raises $20,000 for Red Cross

Poster

Post for the Ice Bar fundraiser

WATKINS GLEN (Star-Gazette) – The average temperature each night was in the high teens, but almost 2,500 people ignored the cold to attend a hot event: the fourth annual Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel Ice Bar in late January. The three-day outdoor and indoor party on the shore of Seneca Lake raised $20,000 for the Finger Lakes Chapter of the American Red Cross.

Last year’s event raised $15,000. The 2015 donation brings the Ice Bar total over four years to $50,000 for Red Cross projects in Schuyler County.

“It has become known as a fun party that benefits something very important,” Christine Peacock, hotel director of sales, said. Peacock said Ice Bar ticket-holders came from as far away as Denver and included a big contingent from Pennsylvania. Friday and Saturday nights both reached the 1,000-ticket maximum. Saturday night tickets sold out in two weeks, Peacock noted.

The donation will be used solely for programs and projects in Schuyler County. In the last year, the Red Cross has responded to a tornado, flash floods and multiple house fires in the county, he said.

The Ice Bar is organized by hotel staff, who, this year, secured 20 community sponsors.

This was just one of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

  • Read Part 1: New York State Wine & Culinary Centre, Cornell Agriculture & Food Technology Farm
  • Read Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Read Part 3: Weaverview Farms, Milly’s Pantry
  • Read Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre, Finger Lakes Economic Development Co.
  • Read Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Read Part 6: Wiemer and Glenora

(c) 2015 Clark Hoskin

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 6

One of our afternoon stops on Day 1 was Hermann J. Wiemer Vineyards, considered by TripAdvisor users as one of the best food and drink experiences in the Finger Lakes.

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

The winery was founded by Hermann Wiemer, who emigrated to the Finger Lakes in the 1960s from Germany’s Mosel Valley. His mother’s family had been making wine in the valley for 300 years.

Welcome Norfolk

Wiemer Vineyards staff welcomed us / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Jeremy Coffey, hospitality and program development manager, Dillon Buckley, assistant winemaker, and other team members greeted us. The group enjoyed a tour of the production area and tasted some of the wines. The group was particularly impressed with the “Welcome Norfolk” message on the wine tasting sheets. There was a true, welcoming ambience upon our arrival, and a sense of professionalism and integrity persisted for our entire visit. Our hosts were very knowledgeable and gracious.

The winery sells high quality vintages that fetch top dollar. For example, Wiemer’s Noble Select Riesling Josef Vineyard 2009 sells for US$135 per bottle. Blanc de Blanc 2008 is priced at US$45 per bottle. However, the winery also has dry Rieslings and Cuvee that sell for US$11 and US$13.50 per bottle. The winery is housed in a 150-year-old barn that was deconstructed on a neighbour’s property and raised on the Wiemer land. Our stop at the winery in winter did not do justice to its exterior.

“Got a couple great ideas at the wineries,” said one of the tour’s participants. “Tinging of the glasses to get people’s attention.”

wine bottles

Bottles of Riesling at Glenora Cellars / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Next, we stopped at Glenora. It is a winery, restaurant and 30-room inn developed by Gene Pierce and his partners after the passage of the New York Farm Winery Act of 1976. Norfolk County staff met Gene at a Finger Lakes culinary tourism event in the summer of 2014, and struck up a conversation, resulting in an offer by the entrepreneur to bring a group of Canadians to his business. Although Gene was out of the country, the group was met by Steve DiFrancesco, winemaker, Bob Madill, brand ambassador, and Kathy Marchenese, event manager, at Glenora Cellars. Samples of wines were provided, followed by dinner.

Cindy Kimble of the Finger Lakes Tourism Alliance welcomed the group and spoke of her organization’s 100+ year history. She encouraged the group to collaborate, not view one another as competitors. Cindy talked about the methods her team uses to determine the cost-benefit analysis in marketing initiatives. (Businesses in Norfolk County may recall that Cindy Kimble was keynote speaker at the Norfolk County Economic Development Symposium in 2009.) Norfolk County Mayor Charlie Luke also greeted the group officially and made comments. After a flavourful salad, Glenora’s chef served pan-roasted chicken, raised locally. Local officials were originally scheduled to join us for dinner, but due to the winter storm, they wisely stayed off the roads.

These were just two of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

(c) Clark Hoskin 2015

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 5

Climbing Bines

Climbing Bines Hop Farm & Brewery / Photo: Melissa Collver

After our stops in Penn Yan, we headed east to Climbing Bines Hop Farm & Brewery, where we met Brian Karweck and his team.

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

Brian explained how he and his business partner, a school teacher, created a business that filled a niche and also engaged their friends, family, neighbours and the community.

The development of Climbing Bines was aided by the passage of the 2013 New York State Farm Brewery Law, which liberalized regulations associated with on-farm breweries. The law was designed to increase demand for locally grown products to further increase economic impact and create new businesses surrounding the brewing industry.

Under the new law, in order to receive a Farm Brewery license in New York State, the beer must be made primarily from locally grown farm products. By 2024, no less than 90% of the hops and all other ingredients must be grown in New York State. Until then, there is a gradual increase in threshold amounts.

The beer manufactured under these guidelines would be designated as “New York State labeled beer.” The legislation was modeled after the 1976 Farm Winery Act, which spurred the growth of wine production in this state, including the creation of 261 farm wineries and tripling the number of wineries.

Brian Karweck of Climbing Bines Hop Farm & Brewery entertains our group / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Brian Karweck of Climbing Bines Hop Farm & Brewery entertains our group / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Under the farm brewery license, brewers do not need an additional permit to serve beer by the glass, which has the highest return for brewers in terms of sales. Farm brewers can also make cider and serve that cider by the glass. They are allowed to have five branch offices, where they can sell their products and other New York State labeled beer, wine, and spirits by the bottle, in addition to having tasting rooms, retail shops, restaurants, and serve samples and sell at farmers markets.

Climbing Bines also created a “Mug Club” aimed at building loyalty among locals and increasing visits and sales in the off-season. Some in the tour group were impressed with the brewery’s method of tracking beer samples.

“Climbing Bines had a great system with their dry erase marker and sheet protector for their tastings,” said one of our participants.

This was just one of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

(c) Clark Hoskin 2015

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 4

bank vault

Melissa Collver of the Waterford Heritage & Agricultural Museum of Norfolk County inspects the former bank vault at the Arts Centre for Yates County / Photo: Hayden Dooney

After lunch on Day 1, the group walked to the Yates County Arts Centre and browsed the local art on display.

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

We met Kris Pearson, Executive Director of the arts centre, who explained how the organization rejuvenated itself, including the renovation of an old bank as the art gallery. The renovation incorporated the bank vault into its exhibits.

One of the challenges was fundraising. Pearson, who has experience in that area in past positions, was surprised early on when her board seemed daunted by the need to raise only $15,000. Her attitude is that the needed money existed in the community. The obstacle is merely that no one has been asked to donate it. By engaging the community, the Yates County Arts Centre was able to listen carefully and designed a program that responded to community needs. As a result, funds are raised, educational programs are expanding, and workshops now take place in an upstairs space, as well as on the organization’s Sunny Point retreat property located on Keuka Lake.

Next, Steve Griffin of the Finger Lakes Economic Development Corp. hopped on the bus. His organization is the sole economic development agency responsible for Yates County. Steve gave us a tour of some of the town’s new developments, including three hotels and two high-end condominiums. The Microtel hotel is almost complete in the downtown core. Last month, developers received approval to proceed with a 72-room Hampton Inn on the waterfront.

Economic Development Officers

Photo: John Christensen, Chronicle-Express

Asked how the town could sustain so many rooms, Steve explained that Penn Yan only has one hotel currently, and lots of sports tourism business and corporate overnight stays were being lost because of the lack of accommodation. Steve’s organization was able to offer hotel developers grants, tax abatement and other incentives to sweeten the deal.

One person on our tour would later write that the key take-away for them was “how important it is to have lived-in downtowns.” Steve’s tour of downtown Penn Yan was the voted favourite stop of Day 1 among the tour group, in a survey.

During the dark days of the flooding of Penn Yan in spring 2014, many people in the area rallied together to get through the catastrophe. It is obvious that the folks of Penn Yan don’t sit around and complain. They work hard and improve! These are great lessons to be learned by any small town in the U.S. or Canada.

“Much of the success of the businesses was based on the theme of build it and they will come,” said another of our tour participants. “We don’t even know what markets we are missing out on if we don’t take a chance and create experiences for people visiting our are.”

While we were in Yates County, John Christensen, reporter for the Penn Yan Chronicle-Express, followed us around and wrote a nice article about the tour.

These were just a few of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

(c) Clark Hoskin 2015

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 3

Weaverview Farms

Weaverview Farms / Photo: Clark Hoskin

We headed south of Geneva and stopped at Weaver-View Farm, operated by a Mennonite family who rent out a well-appointed farmhouse to tourists, offer bed and breakfast experiences, and run a gift shop in the barn.

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

We were met by Pauline Weaver, the mother of the family, who turned out on this increasingly wintery day to show us the house used as a rental property.

We wanted to understand how the Old World values of this family fit into the New Economy, especially a digital one. In the case of Weaver-View, a neighbour operates the website and hand-delivers emails to the family. Then, Pauline calls the person on the phone and makes arrangements. Pauline explained that her family has had many offers from couples engaged to be married to use the property for wedding ceremonies. The barn, while quaint, would need to be brought up to the Building Code so that no one was in any danger.

Our bus headed next to the small town of Penn Yan, which turned out to be one of the highlights of the trip. This town has a heart of gold and never ceases to solve its challenges. Last spring, Penn Yan received 9 inches of rain in a short period of time, and the downtown was flooded. Many buildings were destroyed.

We were served lunch at The Pinwheel Market & Café, also home of Milly’s Pantry. Lunch was chili, soup and quiche made by volunteers in the café’s kitchen.

Pnwheel Cafe

Pinwheel Cafe, Penn Yan, home of Milly’s Pantry / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Suzan Richards of Milly’s Pantry explained the social enterprise housed in this facility. Yates County, which includes Penn Yan, has among the lowest household incomes in New York State. Years ago, a public health nurse named Milly Bloomquist witnessed children who weren’t learning well or were in trouble, tended to be hungry – even on weekends, when the school did not have the students in the building to feed. So Milly created the Weekend Back Pack program. Children could take a back pack filled with food home for the weekend to keep their hunger pangs at bay.

Today, more than 500 students participate in the program every weekend. Suzan explained that many older students are hungry but too proud to ask for a back pack. Commissions from sales of art and jewellery, as well as profits from the café, provide funds to purchase food for the Weekend Back Packs. Susan acknowledged that, by choosing to have lunch at The Pinwheel Café, our tour group helped feed a half-dozen children for a significant period of time. Milly Bloomquist passed away in 2014 in her 90s. However, before she died, she received the Presidential Citizens Medal from U.S. President Barack Obama.

One of the tour’s participants commented: “Very similar issues that we face in Norfolk County are shared by the communities that we visited. The impact that something as simple as a lunch can have on others (Milly’s Pantry). The power of the community partnerships in achieving important community goals.”

These were a few of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

(c) Clark Hoskin 2015

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 2

At the Ramada Waterfront Hotel in Geneva, right on the shoreline of Seneca Lake, our group met Zach Cutlip, owner of Winewagen Tours. The Winewagen – a 1971 Volkswagen Westfalia – is Zach’s brainchild and labour of love.

The tour of the Finger Lakes by rural small business owners from Norfolk County, Canada, was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism.

winewagen tours

Winewagen Tours / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Winewagen Tours is a family owned and operated tour company that provides transportation between wineries, breweries, distilleries, eats and sights throughout the Finger Lakes region. If Zach had his way, he would play Grateful Dead tapes as he drives between the wineries, however he does have a Bluetooth sound system if guests would like to play their own music.

We learned how Zach loves his work while delivering a “wow” experience. He explained that he started out expecting only to book a few tours during a season. He soon learned that his Volkswagen bus is in high demand, and he has taken dozens of tour groups around the Finger Lakes.

Zach acknowledged that he fills a niche tour product area that serves groups who do not want the typical limo or tour bus experience. This was the first time Zach had been asked to prepare a presentation about his business, and he answered several questions from our group. When he asked if anyone wanted a ride to the next stop, a forest of hands went up through the motor coach.

Winewagen Tours / Photo: Hayden Dooney

Winewagen Tours / Photo: Hayden Dooney

After the tour, Zach emailed this message to Norfolk County:

“I had a blast talking with your group and giving some of them a taste of the Winewagen. There were so many things that I could of shared, I just hope your group came away with something from my incoherent ramblings. I guess one thing that has been essential to our growth has been us just being us. Also one of the hardest things has been trusting our own train of thoughts. 

‘I know we like this, but should we change or do something different to appeal to the masses?’ Absolutely not! This has been tough for us but surprisingly has worked. The ones that find us, love us. The ones that don’t, well just don’t and at the end of the day don’t really affect us. We know we aren’t for everybody and that really isn’t our goal either.

Sure, we could have went out and got a stretch limo and could possibly be making way more money, but that was not ever our intention. We don’t share nearly the same passion for a limo and money as we do for our VW bus and the Finger Lakes. We can taste it in a dish at a restaurant or in a glass of wine, the ones that are truly doing what they love will triumph every time. We are truly doing what we love and this translates well in our customers’ experience.   These were just some thoughts I had reminiscing about our meeting and I just needed to remind myself of a few things. Best wishes and we hope to get up to your neck of the woods soon to check out your operation as well.”

On the topic of Winewagen Tours, one of the tour participants said: “Would love to encourage and promote an independent tour operator(s) similar to the WineWagen Tours. This is something that I believe would go over extremely well in our area as the beverage experiences are not centralized and you need some kind of transport to get to experience them. Wonder what that would require in terms of licensing and/or approvals from Norfolk County.”

This was just one of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

(c) Clark Hoskin 2015

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine
Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 1

Rural Canadians learn from U.S. region: Part 1

On March 3, 2015, at 6:00 a.m., a coach bus full of rural small business owners left Norfolk County, Ontario to tour the Finger Lakes region of New York State. The two-day, one-night trip was organized by Norfolk County Tourism & Economic Development and sponsored by Ontario’s Southwest Tourism. It was my great pleasure and honour to serve as tour organizer.

Wine centre sign

New York State Wine & Culinary Centre / Photo by Anita Buehner, Bonnieheath Estate Lavender & Winery

Our first stop in the Finger Lakes was the town of Canandaigua, for a coffee stop at the New York State Wine & Culinary Centre. This centre celebrates and showcases New York’s finest in wine, craft beer, food and agriculture. Pete Rogers, the General Manager, met our group, gave us a general overview of the centre’s activities, and provided coffee and pastries. A few on our tour checked out the tasting room at the centre, which features a rotating array of New York wines, beers and spirits. The centre also has a gift shoppe, conference room, and a restaurant with a patio that overlooks Canandaigua Lake. The Centre is well known for its demonstration theatre and hands-on kitchen. Classes and workshops include everything from wine pairing and bread baking to sausage making, knife skills and beer 101. Local caterers also rent the kitchen to prepare food for off-site events.

One of our tour participants was amazed by the centre: “If Norfolk County had a culinary centre much like the one we visited, it could become a valuable tool to promote the foods, wine, beer and spirits of our area, attract tourists and serve the local community as well.”

John Johnson of The Cornell Agriculture & Food Technology Farm tells our group about his organization / Photo: Clark Hoskin
John Johnson of The Cornell Agriculture & Food Technology Farm tells our group about his organization / Photo: Clark Hoskin

Our next stop was Geneva, home of The Cornell Agriculture & Food Technology Park, also known as “The Technology Farm”. The Certified Business Incubator is located on 72 acres of former Cornell University research orchards. We met John Johnson, the Executive Director, who explained the history of this $7-million complex. The building has one of the most advanced ventilation systems, and can completely exchange all the air in three minutes. One of most successful businesses on The Technology Farm is Cheribundi, founded by a local man who moved away, but returned to Geneva to visit his family. During one trip, he discovered that cherry juice helped with his aches and pains. He decided to turn the opportunity into a business. It took a few years for Cheribundi to create its processes and find markets. Now, every 8-ounce bottle of Cheribundi cherry juice has over 50 sour cherries in it. Packed with phytonutrients, the sour cherry is known as “the tart cherry“ in the U.S. and is a source of nutrients for the body. Cheribundi has built their entire company around the cherry, supporting the farmers who grow them and perfecting a juicing process that retains all of its delicious benefits. Although The Technology Farm acknowledges that an incubator usually operates on the concept that new businesses will leave the nest, the food business requires more patience to develop innovative processes and enter very competitive markets.

Cheribundi sells their juice to over 100 professional and college teams, including the New England Patriots, NFL Superbowl Champions. Cheribundi has become so successful that the Tech Farm is seeking funds to build a new facility for their manufacturing process. They will need a bigger facility, as John Johnson explained that the Cheribundi juice will soon be sold across the U.S. through Walmart stores.

Down the hall, our tour group saw the manufacturing facility for Stony Brook WholeHeartedFoods, which presses oil from squash and pumpkin seeds. The company’s partner, Martin Farms, grows Butternut, Delica and Kobacha squash and provides the seeds to Stony Brook, which uses an artisal process to create culinary oils. The company also produces pepitas, brined and roasted pumpkin seeds grown by U.S. producers.

“The Cornell Agriculture & Food Technology Park was fantastic and would be an awesome template for us to try in Norfolk County,” one of our participants said.

These were just two of the stops along the way on the Norfolk County Finger Lakes Study Tour. Watch this blog for more chapters in the story. See photos of the trip on the Invest in Norfolk facebook page.

Finger Lakes Study Tour blog posts

  • Part 1: Wine & Culinary Centre | Technology Farm
  • Part 2: Winewagen Tours
  • Part 3: Weaverview Farms | Milly’s Pantry
  • Part 4: Yates County Arts Centre | Finger Lakes Ec Dev
  • Part 5: Climbing Bines Hop Yard & Brewery
  • Part 6: Wiemer Vineyards | Glenora Cellars
  • Part 7: Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel | Ice Bar
  • Part 8: Finger Lakes Distilling
  • Part 9: Cornell Lab of Ornithology | Ithaca Commons
  • Part 10: Americana Vineyards
  • Part 11: Seneca County Army Depot
  • Part 12: Seneca Falls
  • Part 13: Warfields Restaurant
  • Part 14: Debriefing at The Combine